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What is a rebounder?

A rebounder is essentially a mini-trampoline.   Mine is small and light enough that I can easily move it throughout the house.  Currently, it’s in my office and I can take mini-rebounder breaks from work.  I can listen to a podcast or training and rebound.  And if there was something on TV that I wanted to watch, I can easily move it to our living room. 

I purchased mine on Amazon, but it looks exactly like the one pictured below at Sears for $38.00.   You can see that they come in many varieties, but if you are new to this, I wouldn’t worry about getting fancy just yet. But if you are unstable on your feet, then yes, perhaps consider one with some support. 

Here are a few examples from an online search…

 

What is rebounding?

That’s easy!  You just jump on it!  Just like you would jump on a trampoline, sans the somersaults! 

There’s no right or wrong way. 

You can lightly bounce.  

And some use it more aggressively, really lifting their knees, and I’ve also seen some do a form of kick-boxing on a rebounder. 

It can be used in any manner that you are comfortable with. 

And if you can’t do this yourself, you can sit on a chair, put your feet on the rebounder, and have someone else bounce for you!  How amazing is that!?!  So, #noexcuses!

 

How the Lymphatic System works…

Let’s review some physiology.  

You have a circulatory system of arteries & veins, and your heart pumps your blood.   That’s easy right?

You also have a lymphatic system. It’s pictured below and it’s important to understand that this system does not have an organ to pump the lymph fluid. It is designed with one way valves so that lymph fluid can always move back toward the heart, but can not drain and pool at your feet. 

You can think of it like the capital letters “I I” and “V”.

The valves can  open (I I) and lymph can go up, toward the heart.  The valves close “V” and the lymph fluid is restricted from falling back down into our feet. 

It’s also important to understand that our lymphatic system is a critical component of our detoxification systems.   Lymph fluid is filled with toxins, pathogens and other garbage. That said, it’s best to keep it moving, not let it accumulate right? 

The goal is to get the lymph fluid back to the heart, which can then send it to your organs of elimination. 

Here’s a picture of your lymph system.  Take a minute to see how it networks from your head to your toes. 

In summary:

  • The lymph system is part of our detox systems
  • We have lymph vessels filtering our blood, from head to toe
  • The lymph fluid gets filled with garbage that we should not want to hold on to
  • Since it does not have a heart to pump it, it needs us to move
  • You can do any form of movement/exercise, but those one-way valves respond to the zero-gravity created as you spring in to the air.  This helps the lymph move upward, toward the heart, where it can be moved into the circulatory system and then find it’s way out of our bodies.  The lymphatic pump becomes very active during exercise, often increasing lymph flow 10 to 30 fold (1).

Want the technical info?  Rebounding produces a change in the body’s fluid pressure with relatively little muscular effort. At the bottom of each bounce, waste products and toxins are squeezed out from between the cells. When the body rebounds into the air, nutrients pass from the lymph into the cells. At the height of the bounce, the body is weightless (zero gravity), and the lymph begins to flow. As the body descends the lymphatic fluid flows along, pulling the extracted wastes with it.

 

The lymphatic system is a critical component of our detoxification system. 

Anything that creates moments of zero gravity
(like rebounding) helps move lymph. 

 

3 (Good!) Reasons to rebound daily!

  1. It’s a superb, low-impact form of exercise.  Now, don’t let that low-impact thing fool you.  NASA has their astronauts rebound because it is truly one of the best forms of exercise we have found to date.  Rebounding is an all-around workout that you need in order to tone up, strengthen your limbs and core, as well as help you to enjoy the benefits of living a healthy life. You don’t need to have weights, you don’t need a treadmill, and you don’t need a lot of time in order to get into the best shape of your life.  It’s easy on the joints, but has incredible potential to build muscles, and strengthen tendons.  You will also build strength from the upper body exercises, as well as durability and endurance from the cardio workouts. The rebounder is much, much more than a small exercise trampoline; it’s a complete body workout machine. 
  2. We need to detox and rebounders are part of the equation!   The world is full of toxins.  The air we breath has pollution, metals, pesticides, herbicides, etc.   The water we drink has excreted pharmaceutical byproducts, the same pesticides/herbicides that have made their way into rivers, etc.   Our homes have carpets & paints with VOC’s.  Toxins are essentially inevitable.  But God gave us mechanisms to handle a lot of this stuff, we just have to be smart enough to use them!  In addition to our kidneys and livers doing some cleansing, so does our lymph system as I explained above.  But we need to help it or all of that “gunk” just accumulates. Rebounding is one of the best ways to stimulate the movement of the lymph fluid. 
  3. Rebounding is an inexpensive – and convenient – way to get off your duff no matter what the weather is.   You don’t need shoes or fancy work out clothes.  You don’t need to commute to and from the gym.  You just jump on it and bounce.  Do it for a few minutes in the morning.  Do it a few minutes as you watch the news.  It’s the easiest way to get in some serious exercise! 
  4. Bonus reason:  The health benefits you will experience using a rebounder will also shape your life. As you get into the routine of rebounding, you will feel yourself having more energy, you will also look and feel better as you begin to tone up and get into shape. The confidence that comes from being in shape and being self-disciplined will also be of benefit in your day-to-day routine. You’ll find yourself more focused at work, and having more of a drive and desire to be proactive and achieve your goals.

How long should you rebound?

  • As always, consult with your health care provider first. 
  • If you are a newbie or have poor health, start slow.  See if you can do 3 minutes of gentle jumping.  Work up as tolerated. Although it doesn’t feel like much at the time, you might have sore knees or hips the next day. 
  • If you already are active on some level, aim for 5 minutes a day and increase. 
  • The ultimate goal is up to you, but I’d recommend working up to a minimum of 10 minutes a day if you just want to facilitate detoxification.  Work up to 30 minutes when you are ready to get fit. 

Because of my Lyme history, I started out at a few minutes myself.  I’ve worked up to 15-20 minutes and I get pretty aggressive.  I even do a little kick boxing.  I really make an effort to bounce high, and also to lift my knees as if I was running in place.  It’s becoming a great form of exercise for me! 

Do YOU already rebound?  Tell me! 

 

 

References:

  • -C. Guyton, M.D., and John E. Hall, Ph.D., Textbook of Medical Physiology, Ninth Edition
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